Tag Archives: TBR

Summer Reading Goals: 20 Books of Summer Reading Challenge

20 books

Even though I’m no longer in school, I still find that I always get more reading done during the summer than during any other season. A big part of this is that I love to read outside; there’s just something so nice about lying on the beach or my roof and enjoying the sunshine with a good book. I also love to set summer reading goals and TBRs, so the 20 Books of Summer Challenge, hosted by 746 Books, is perfect. Here are the 20 books I’m hoping to read this summer (although I’m also hoping to get a few more in there); all are on my physical TBR shelf except for a few that haven’t been released yet and two that I’ve pre-ordered on ebook.

Nonfiction:

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) BodySmoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory

I have two memoirs at the top of my TBR for the summer. Roxane Gay’s Hunger, a memoir that focuses on her relationship with food and her body, comes out in June, and since she’s rapidly becoming one of my favorite authors, I’m going to need to read it pretty much immediately. I’ve also had Caitlin Doughty’s Smoke Gets in Your Eyes on my TBR since it was released, and I’ve heard nothing but great things about this memoir by a female mortician.

Next in series:

A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #3)White Hot (Hidden Legacy, #2)Wildfire (Hidden Legacy, #3)Down Among the Sticks and Bones (Wayward Children, #2)

Sometimes I’m just really in the mood for some fast-paced fantasy in the summer. I haven’t yet started the final book in Sarah J. Maas’s A Court of Thorns and Roses series, A Court of Wings and Ruin, which was released in May, and I’m thinking this summer is the perfect time to get to it. Awesomely, Ilona Andrews, one of my favorite fantasy authors, is releasing both the second and third books in her Hidden Legacy trilogy this summer, only months apart, and since I’ve pre-ordered both ebooks, I’m very much looking forward to getting back into this series that focuses on families with magical dynasties and a lie-detecting protagonist. Another anticipated release this summer for me is Seanan McGuire’s Down Among the Sticks and Bones, which is the second book in a YA series focused on children who have traveled to different portal fantasy worlds.

Literary fiction:

The Lonely Hearts HotelHomegoingOranges Are Not the Only FruitThe Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake

The GirlsThe Panopticon

I have very, very good feelings about the books in this category. Several are books that I’ve added to TBRs before but haven’t ever actually started; most of them are books that I think have the potential to really wow me.

Short story collections:

Children of the New World: StoriesThe Unfinished World: And Other StoriesBloodchild and Other Stories

I’m falling a little behind on my goal of reading one short story collection per month in 2017, so I’m looking to catch up by reading three collections this summer. I’ve barely started The Unfinished World by Amber Sparks but I already love her lyrical style; I’ve heard that she uses magical realism and science fiction elements in her stories, which I’m always a fan of. I’m thinking that Octavia Butler’s Bloodchild will be absolutely amazing; I’m kind of regretting starting the Amber Sparks collection first because I’m kind of in the mood to start that one. Alexander Weinstein’s Children of the New World is also science fiction, and I think I could get down with some of that this summer.

Classics:

North and SouthHerland

After not reading any classics for about the past two years, I’m trying to get back into them with the help of the Serial Reader app, which helps you read small chunks of classics every day. (It’s free! And it’s really been working for me!) So far, I’m about 1/3 of the way through Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South, which was published in 1854 and depicts a romance while also delving into class and labor struggles in nineteenth-century England. I’m definitely enjoying it so far; in the past I’ve loved the BBC miniseries adaptation and I’ll probably need to re-watch it after I finish the book. Next, I’m thinking of picking up Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, author of the short story The Yellow Wallpaper, which was published in 1915 and is a feminist story about an all-female utopian society. It’s much shorter than North and South, so I’ll hopefully get to start another classic as well before the summer ends.

Science fiction/fantasy:

The Last OneBorderline (The Arcadia Project, #1)Lagoon

These might be my most anticipated reads of the summer. Alexandra Olivia’s The Last One depicts an apocalyptic event that takes place during the filming of a survivalist reality TV show; Mishell Baker’s Borderline was nominated for the Nebula and focuses on a double amputee with Borderline Personality Disorder who is in charge of policing the traffic between our world and a fantasy world; and  Nnedi Okorafor’s Lagoon is a first-contact-with-aliens story set in Nigeria. I mean, how awesome do those descriptions sound?

 

What do you all plan to read this summer? Let me know in the comments!

 

 

 

March TBR & Reading Goals

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In March, my goal is to keep up with my goal of reading one short story collection per month (setting the bar low, you guys) and also to #readmyowndamnbooks! Of course I went to the library today immediately after setting that goal, but that’s OK. A lot of what I want to read this month are books that I hauled during February, because they just look so pretty and tempting. I’m especially intrigued by The Last One by Alexandra Olivia, which seems to be about an apocalyptic event that takes place during a reality TV show and involves the contestants having to determine what is real and what’s staged. My short story collection pick for the month is There Once Lived a Girl Who Seduced Her Sister’s Husband, and He Hanged Himself by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya; how can you resist a book with a title like that? Will the title itself be longer than the stories? I guess I’ll find out!

I’m considering adding another monthly challenge for myself in addition to reading one short story collection per month, but I’m not sure if it’s going to be too much pressure for a mood reader like me. A few months ago I joined the Book of the Month Club, and so I’ve been getting at least one (but actually more like 2 or 3) recently published books per month from this subscription service. I haven’t actually been reading my Book of the Month within that month, though, because that’s tough for me to do; I’m thinking, though, that I’d like to try reading at least one Book of the Month Club book each month this year, regardless of which month I actually received it. Last month I read Bryn Greenwood’s All the Ugly and Wonderful Things (which was actually voted Book of the Year for that subscription service in 2016) and this month I think I’m going to go with Sara Flannery Murphy’s The Possessions. It seems like a book that’s right in my wheelhouse; it’s about a woman working for a company that organizes spiritual possessions for relatives of the recently deceased.

I have a few other random titles on my physical TBR for the month as well. I picked up a copy of Amanda Lovelace’s The Princess Saves Herself in This One, a poetry collection supposedly similar in style and theme to Rupi Kaur’s Milk and Honey (which I LOVED) and am hoping to read that in one sitting this month. I’d like to FINALLY get to Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing, which I’ve been meaning to read for months now and am embarrassed I haven’t yet picked up. And finally, I think I’ll probably want to read at least one YA book this month, and when I was at the library I found On the Edge of Gone by Corinne Duyvis, which I saw highly recommended by one of my favorite booktubers. It’s a science fiction story about an autistic girl attempting to get her family places on one of the last spaceships leaving a dying Earth.

Lab GirlWild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

As far as audiobooks go, I actually want to finish Lab Girl by Hope Jahren this month. I’m still on the waiting list at my library, but I’ve really been struggling to get into any other audiobooks lately and I feel like I need to finish the one I’ve already started before I’ll be able to start anything new. If I do manage to finish Lab Girl, then Wild by Cheryl Strayed is next on my audio list. I’m pretty sure I said exactly these same things last month about audiobooks, but unfortunately not much has changed on the audiobook front since then!

 

What are you all planning on reading in March? Let me know!

 

 

February TBR

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I avoided making a TBR list for January because I felt the hints of an oncoming reading slump and wanted to try to avoid it by not putting reading pressure on myself. It worked (sort of)–I did end up reading a lot in January, but they weren’t the books that I had really wanted to read; even if I didn’t really have a TBR, I sort of subconsciously did make one.

So for February, I’m back to making an actual TBR. I’d like to actually pick up books that I’m really excited about and have been really looking forward to reading and challenge myself to stick to that TBR as much as possible. (We’ll see how that goes.) I’d like to start by finishing the books I started but wasn’t able to finish during January, and finish by starting some enticing new ones. And, most importantly, I actually really need to #readmyowndamnbooks.

Currently reading and would like to finish in Feb:

Our Endless Numbered DaysEverything I Never Told YouLab Girl

I’ve been in such an audiobook slump lately (I’ve talked a lot in the past about how not being an auditory learner kept me away from audiobooks for a long time, but I’d actually gotten into a pretty decent rhythm with them until recently) and so I wasn’t able to finish Lab Girl by Hope Jahren within my checkout time from the library back in December; unfortunately I’m still on the wait list for it, so I’ll have to see if I’m able to get ahold of it in February. If not, it goes on the TBR for March. I’m about 1/2 of the way done with the audio of Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng and, since I just checked it out from the library for another two weeks, I am very hopeful about finishing it this month. The writing is really beautifully done; I don’t typically pick up books that are mainly character studies like this one is, but it’s really resonating with me so far.

I’m also part of the way through Claire Fuller’s Our Endless Numbered Days (print, not audio) and honestly just haven’t been in the right mood to pick it up in awhile, despite the fact that it’s very good. It’s about a young girl who’s essentially kidnapped from her mother by her survivalist father, although she doesn’t see it that way, and about those events and their aftermath once she’s been returned home years later. I’m only about fifty pages in so far.

New TBR books for Feb:

All the Ugly and Wonderful ThingsLord of the FliesKissing the Witch: Old Tales in New SkinsSleeping Giants (Themis Files #1)Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest TrailThe Mothers

I’d love to pick up one of my Book of the Month Club picks during February (since all of them sound so good) and I think I’m going to start with the book that was voted 2016’s Book of the Year–All The Ugly and Wonderful Things by Bryn Greenwood. I really don’t know how I’m going to feel about this one, but I’m super curious from all the hype. I’d also like to pick up a classic at the beginning of the  year rather than keep procrastinating and never actually read one (like I did in 2016) and I recently ordered a copy of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies, which is one of those books that it seems like everyone else got assigned to read in high school but I never did, and then I never picked it up later because I felt like I’d heard so much about it that it wasn’t worth reading. But I changed my mind and would actually like to read it now.

I also want to pick up at least one short story collection in February, and I think I’m probably going to go with Emma Donoghue’s Kissing the Witch, which is a collection of interconnected feminist fairy tale retellings. This sounds right up my alley and I’d meant to read it during Bout of Books, so now I’m actually going to get to it this month. Other TBR picks include Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel, which I actually started last night and am really liking; The Mothers by Brit Bennet, because I do not want to be missing out on the amazingness that I have heard about any longer; and Wild by Cheryl Strayed, which will be the next audiobook I start after Everything I Never Told You unless Lab Girl comes in first.

So, my TBR is a little ambitious but I do feel like it’s do-able, although I could always get distracted and pick up something different (let’s be honest, I totally will). But at least some of these are definitely getting read this month! And I’m totally going to hold myself to #readmyowndamnbooks only this month, except for audiobooks.

 

What are you planning on reading in February? Let me know!

Readathon TBRs: 24 in 48 and Diverseathon

I’ve been having a REALLY hard time with TBRs this month; I’ve essentially completely ignored mine except to read all of the graphic novels on my TBR list for Bout of Books. Sometimes I just really get into the mood-reader zone and can’t focus on any lists I’ve made for myself; one of the things I’d really like to do in 2017 is feel less guilty about letting go of my TBR and not pressuring myself to #readmyowndamnbooks if I’m on a roll with library books or ebooks or whatever. Sometimes I just get reading slump-y and can’t focus, and that needs to be OK.

That being said, I also LOVE readathons, and especially creating TBRs for them. In these next few weeks before the end of January, I’m planning to participate in both the 24 in 48 readathon (this will my third time participating) and the Diverseathon (this will be my first time participating!). They sort of overlap, which is awesome: #24in48 takes place this weekend (Jan 21-22) whereas Diverseathon lasts a full week (Jan 22-29).

The 24 in 48 readathon focuses on attempting to read for 24 hours within a 48-hour period (something I’ve never been able to accomplish, and especially won’t this year); you can find out more information here: https://24in48.com/. I’m expecting my participation this round to be less than stellar because I’ll be in D.C. this weekend for the Women’s March on Washington, but I’m planning to grab reading time whenever I can and to keep checking in on everyone’s reading on Instagram and Litsy.

As far as my TBR goes, there’s definitely going to be some overlap with my #Diverseathon TBR (although really, when am I going to have time to read this weekend??), so the only book I really have set aside for #24in48 is Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit, which I think fits in well with both the Women’s March and is a short book that would actually be realistic for me to finish during my trip.

Men Explain Things To Me (Updated Edition)

Diverseathon is a week-long readathon that focuses on reading diverse books, particularly #ownvoices books, and it’s a readathon that began on BookTube but is open to anyone across bookish social media. I first heard about it from Joce’s channel @squibblesreads, and you can find more information on her announcement video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G50d6cQ_Cko&t=0s. (I don’t really use twitter, but you can also check out the Diverseathon account here: https://twitter.com/diverseathon).

I have a more solid readathon plan in place for this one as opposed to #24in48 (because hopefully I’ll have more time to read!): I’m planning on finishing the audiobook of Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng and reading the print editions of The Mothers by Brit Bennett and Kindred by Octavia Butler. I’ve been hearing AMAZING things about Everything I Never Told You–I just barely started the audio today, but since I listen to audiobooks so slowly, I’m sure I’ll still only be partway through by the time the readathon starts. I’ve also heard that The Mothers is an incredible read; I don’t think I’ve read a single review that was less than stellar. I’ve mentioned before on my blog that Octavia Butler is one of my favorite authors and that my goal is eventually to read all of her books; everything I’ve read by her so far has absolutely blown me away, and Kindred will be my fifth Butler book.

Everything I Never Told YouThe MothersKindred

 

Is anyone else participating in either of these readathons? Let me know!

November TBR & Discussion

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So, in November, I’d ideally really like to finish the Book Riot Read Harder Challenge; I only have 3 tasks left (read a middle-grade book, read a book out loud to someone, and read a book by or about a person from Southeast Asia) and I think it’s a reasonable plan. I’m planning to actually, finally finish Furthermore for my middle-grade book, even if I have to resort to audio for part of it; I’m hoping to read some books out loud to one of my little cousins for the reading aloud task; and I’ve already started Sorceror to the Crown, whose author, Zen Cho, is from Malaysia.

Beyond that, I’m also planning on taking part in the Tome Topple challenge, which takes place during the last two weeks of November (Nov 18-Dec 1). This challenge is sort of a response to all of the readathons where your goal is to read as many books as possible (which many people respond to by reading lots of really short works and graphic novels) and the goal is to tackle books over 500 pages. It’s nice because it’s very low-pressure; you’re aiming to read as much of one of those giant books as you can, and if you don’t end up finishing a book during the challenge, that’s OK. I personally love really long books, and this challenge is giving me an extra push to try and read one or two before the end of the year. I’ve been thinking that I’d really like to read 1Q84 before 2016 is up, but I have a lot of other options; The Bone Clocks is another strong contender. I’m going to hold  off on setting an official TBR for this readathon because it’s not until the end of the month and I’m expecting a new tome in the mail before then (the first book in the Mistborn trilogy) which might demand me to read it immediately.

Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear SugarA Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1)Sorcerer to the Crown (Sorcerer Royal, #1)The Bone ClocksCrooked Kingdom (Six of Crows, #2)Six of Crows (Six of Crows, #1)HomegoingGutshot

I did set a loose TBR for November as a whole, which also includes Gutshot by Amelia Gray, which is a book of short stories that are supposed to be dark and disturbing. Amelia Gray is actually doing a reading in my city tomorrow that I’m planning on going to, so I’d like to get my copy of her book signed and then start that one. I found out about the reading just the other day or I’d have tried to read it beforehand! I’d also really like to finish my re-read of Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo so that I can finally get to Crooked Kingdom, and I’d love to also finally pick up Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, which I have heard nothing but amazing things about.

For my audiobooks this month, my top two priorities are Tiny Beautiful Things by Cheryl Strayed, which I’ve already started and is already just wrecking me emotionally, and A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab, which is so ridiculously popular that I’ve gotten really curious about it. My audiobook listening tends to be sporadic; I listened to 4 audiobooks last month, but who knows how many I’ll get to this month. I do have a road trip coming up in mid-November with about a six-hour drive to get to my friend’s wedding and six hours back. That means 12 hours of bonus audiobook time, and I plan on taking full advantage.

I’ve been hearing a lot lately about Nonfiction November, and it sounds like a really great reading challenge–essentially your goal is to read as much nonfiction as you can in November, or to read more than you usually do, and there are specific tasks involved. I decided that I won’t be participating, though; I do like reading nonfiction, but I’m still a mostly fiction girl at heart. I typically read 1-3 nonfiction books a month, and that seems like a good amount for me.

 

What are you guys planning to read in November? Let me know!

Dewey’s Readathon Game Plan and TBR

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I love October. It’s full of spooky, Halloween-related things and delicious pumpkin everything. October also means it’s time for another Dewey’s 24-hour Readathon, which tend to be the most awesome bookish events of the year. One of my favorite parts about the readathon is actually the anticipation and planning that come before the event; I love creating a TBR pile to sustain me through extended periods of reading, and figuring out how to maximize my reading time when I know I’ll still have to do things like work and sleep.

For me, the Readathon starts at 8 a.m. on Saturday morning. Like last time, unfortunately, I have to work the morning of the Readathon; I’m planning to get as much work as I can done ahead of time so that I can leave work in the early afternoon, hopefully by 1 or 2. I’ve found that listening to my audiobook on the way to and from work helps get me into the Readathon mindset early, even if I can’t fully participate until later.  I had to work the morning of the previous Readathon, too, and this really burnt me out (being on call for work all weekend didn’t help, either; once I started reading I kept getting interrupted). At least I’m not on call this time! And I’m planning on picking up Thai food from the delicious place near my office to bring home after work, as well, which is also a good motivator.

Once I finally get home, I’m hoping to hit the Readathon hard. I’ve found that it helps me to start with shorter books so that I can feel like I’m accomplishing something; that way, if I get stalled on my reading later, I’ll still know that I’ve hit a few reading goals.

Goals!

-Read 3 books – pretty doable if I stick to shorter ones

-Read for 12 hours – this will mean I’m basically reading the entire day when I’m not at work, so I’m being a bit ambitious here

-Post updates on Instagram, Litsy, and here

My TBRs for readathons tend to look a lot different from my monthly TBRs. I find that short books, YA, fast-paced reads, and graphic novels tend to work the best for me in a readathon; I need books that can either hold my attention for an extended period of time or that allow me to jump back and forth pretty quickly. I tend to look for “easier” reads and not try to tackle anything too ambitious, as reading an extremely complicated book for a few hours can make me start to look for a reading break rather than feel inspired to keep going all night long (which I never do, by the way. I’m a terrible sleeper to begin with and I can’t afford to give up a whole night’s sleep). I also need a good, absorbing audiobook that I can listen to while driving and doing random things around the house so that I don’t lose out on reading time if I need to get other things done.

So! Here is my TBR for Dewey’s, ranked in order of most to least likely to actually read. To clarify, there is no way that I would actually be able to read all of these books, but I think that these are a good selection for me to choose from:

Forest of MemoryForest of MemoryForest of MemoryForest of Memory

Forest of Memory by Mary Robinette Kowal – this is a science fiction novella by the author of Shades of Milk and Honey, which was sort of a Jane Austen retelling with magic that I read a few years ago and liked but didn’t love. This shorter novel is about a woman who loses contact with her A.I. and is unable to connect with the outside world, something that is constant and ubiquitous in the future, and has to deal with some sort of scary situation in the woods. I don’t really want to read too much about the plot since it’s a short work and I don’t want to spoil it, but it sounds sort of Octobery and I’ve been in a science fiction mood lately, so this is currently #1 on my list.

Fun Home: A Family TragicomicFun Home: A Family TragicomicFun Home: A Family TragicomicFun Home: A Family Tragicomic

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel – this is a graphic memoir about a daughter finding out that her father was gay after his death. I previously read Evie Wyld’s Everything is Teeth, another graphic memoir, and really enjoyed the format; I think this will be a good graphic novel to go with for the readathon.

Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff – I was sort of waffling about whether to read this for a really long time, until I sort of did a 180 and decided I needed to own this book immediately. It’s science fiction YA about two teenagers who break up and then get caught up in this huge adventure/conspiracy where their planet is at stake; the reason I think it’ll work well for the readathon is that it’s not written in a straightforward book way but made up of transcipts, emails, interviews, etc. I heard that it’s fast-paced and an easy read, so I think this might be the perfect thing for me.

Pretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The ShrikePretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The ShrikePretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The ShrikePretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The Shrike

Alex + Ada, Vol. 1Alex + Ada, Vol. 1Alex + Ada, Vol. 1Alex + Ada, Vol. 1

Pretty Deadly by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios and Alex + Ada by Jonathan Luna and Sarah Vaughn – I don’t know much about either of these graphic novels but I’ve seen them both recommended around BookTube. I tend to only pick up graphic novels during Readathons, so it’s always sort of fun to jump into a new one to mix up my reading.

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)

The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers – this is my current read, and it’s fantastic. I don’t usually tend to go for what I’m currently reading during Dewey’s, but I like having it as an option.

The Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist Revolution

The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley – this is my audiobook pick, and while I’m really interested in the content, I’m not loving the audio narrator so far. If it keeps going the way it is I might have to do a last-minute switch!

GutshotGutshotGutshotGutshot

Gutshot by Amelia Gray – this is a dark, supposedly super disturbing short story collection; I’ll pick this up if I’m in the mood for something October-y.

FurthermoreFurthermoreFurthermoreFurthermore

Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi – I started this middle-grade novel last month but wasn’t really getting into it; I think I need to give it another try because I’m a huge fan of Tahereh Mafi and the worldbuilding did seem very cool.

 

So that’s the plan for Saturday! Who else is participating? What are you planning on reading? Feel free to link me to your posts, I love to see what everyone else is doing for Dewey’s!

 

WWW Wednesday!

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WWW Wednesday is a weekly feature hosted by Taking on a World of Words where you answer the 3 W’s: What are you currently reading? What did you recently finish reading? What do you think you’ll read next?

What did you recently finish reading?

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I recently finished two short, dark, and October-y books: The Vegetarian by Han Kang and The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson. Both were very good, and somewhat disturbing; they left me wanting to look for something a little happier to read next. I’m so glad to have finally read The Vegetarian after hearing all of the hype; I thought the writing was excellent and I loved how it was told in shifting perspectives.

I also recently finished an October-y audiobook, Bird Box by Josh Malerman. I wasn’t a huge fan of this book–the premise sounded interesting (people starting killing themselves mysteriously, and we discover it’s linked to something they see that their brains are unable to handle; the world descends into a post-apocalyptic scenario with people essentially trapped inside their houses and leaving only when blindfolded) but the writing wasn’t great, and the characters were very flat. It definitely scared me, though, which was what I wanted out of a horror audiobook.

What are you currently reading?

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I recently started Helen Phillips’s The Beautiful Bureaucrat to continue the streak of weird, short books in October. This book focuses on a young woman who gets a desk job where all she does is input numbers attached to names into a database, having no idea what the purpose is. Supposedly things start to get super strange from there, although I haven’t gotten that far yet. I do really like the writing. I’m also almost done with my current audiobook, Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson, which I’m liking and finding very easy to listen to. It’s a memoir/collection of essays about her life and struggles with mental illness.

What do you think you’ll read next?

I’m not sure! I’m getting super excited for Dewey’s Readathon on Oct 22, and have already started to put together my TBR stack for that, which I’ll talk about in an upcoming post. For audio, I’m really hoping to start Kameron Hurley’s The Geek Feminist Revolution soon, but I’m waiting it to come in from the library. As far as physical books go, I’d like to read at least one more before Dewey’s starts, but I’m not sure what to go with.

 

What is everyone reading right now? Feel free to link me to your WWW Wednesday posts!