Tag Archives: reading goals

Halfway Through 2017: Reading Goals Check-In

So, at the beginning of 2017 I set a whole bunch of reading goals to help myself stay on track to read lots of different types of books and find new favorites. Since we’re halfway through the year (what?!) and I just met my Goodreads goal of reading 50 books (yay!), I thought I’d do a progress check-in for myself to see which goals I’ve actually been accomplishing and which I need to give a little more love to in the second half of 2017.

 

Reading Goal #1: Read more than one classic, including one longer classic

How am I doing? Not too shabby! Thanks to the help of the Serial Reader app, which I discovered on Litsy, I’ve finished 2 classics so far in 2017 (which is 2 more than I read in 2016), North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell and Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and one of those is what I’d call a “longer classic;” North and South was 531 pages long.

Reading Goal #2: Read more diversely

How am I doing? I could be doing a lot better; I definitely need to read more books by diverse authors in the second half of 2017. Right now I’m in the middle of listening to The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas on audiobook, and I’m also currently reading Hunger by Roxane Gay, but looking through the 50 completed books on my Goodreads shelf, very few are by #ownvoices authors.

Reading Goal #3: #readmyowndamnbooks

How am I doing? According to my Goodreads shelves, which I think are up-to-date, so far 28 of the 50 books I’ve read have been from my physical TBR shelf. I honestly don’t know if that’s a good ratio or not; it does seem like I’ve been reading a lot of physical books vs. library books, but library audiobooks are throwing off my ratio.

Reading Goal #4: Read more big books

How am I doing? OK, but not great. I’ve read four 500+ page books so far this year: North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell, Stiletto by Daniel O’Malley, Replica by Lauren Oliver, and The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee. The amount of big books I finished isn’t bad, but there are so many really long books on my TBR that have been there for so long that I’d really like to tackle.

Reading Goal #5: Read more lesser-known and/or independently published books

How am I doing? On one hand, I have read some lesser-known books and I did pick up a bunch of books from indie publishers at BookCon, but on the other hand, I do feel like a lot of my reading this year has unintentionally focused on popular 2016 and 2017 releases.

Reading Goal #6: Discover new favorite authors

How am I doing? Hmmm. To be honest, I’m not sure that I can honestly say that any author I’ve discovered so far this year has become a new favorite. I’ve found new authors that I’ve really liked, but I can’t really say that there have been any that I’ve necessarily loved. So that’s a bit unfortunate. I guess that’s something I really need to address in the next six months.

Reading Goal #7: Read more books from authors I love

How am I doing? Well, so far I’ve read another book from only three already-loved authors: Jeff Vandermeer (Borne), Roxane Gay (Difficult Women), and Ilona Andrews (Magic Binds). So, not very well.

Reading Goal #8: Relax, and enjoy what you read

How am I doing? Pretty well! I’m trying not to let myself feel guilty for picking up “fun” reads rather than more highbrow literature when I’m in the mood for it.

Secret Goals

So, in addition to my stated goals from the beginning of the year, I also have a few “secret goals,” which are reading goals that either seem silly or unrealistic so I didn’t write them down. The first of these goals was to read 100 books, which I’ve never before been able to accomplish in a year. I didn’t want to make this an “official” reading goal, because I didn’t want to put pressure on myself and dissuade myself from picking up longer reads when I’m in the mood for them. Since I’m already at 50 books, though, I may just make it.

My second “secret goal” is to win a giveaway on Goodreads. I’ve been entering giveaways for books I’m interested in since I joined Goodreads and have yet to win one. I’m definitely picky about what giveaways I enter, since I only want to win a book if I’m genuinely excited about wanting to read it, which means that I do enter a lot of the more popular ones. This is the one goal I really have no control over, but I’m going to keep trying!

 

How are you all doing on your reading goals? Let me know in the comments!

2017 Reading Goals

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Here are my (belated) reading goals for 2017! I’ve been thinking a lot about the books I managed to read in 2016 and how I can adapt that in 2017 so that I can not only get more enjoyment out of my reading but hopefully also continue to learn more and more through books. Pictured above are the ten books at the top of my TBR list for thisΒ  year, and below are the goals that I’ll try to use to shape my reading in 2017.

Reading Goal #1: Read more than one classic, including one longer classic – I completely failed at my goal to read at least one classic in 2016 (I read zero) but this year I’m determined. My classics reading has really taken a nosedive in recent years, but I really do enjoy them–not to mention I hate feeling like I haven’t read certain books that pretty much everyone else has.

Potential reads: Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, Persuasion by Jane Austen, Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

Reading Goal #2: Read more diversely – I didn’t do as well at reading diversely in 2016 as I’d wanted to. This year, I’d like to significantly increase the percentage of books I read by diverse authors.

Potential reads: Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor, Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, The Mothers by Brit Bennett, A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki, The Devourers by Indra Das, and about a million other books

Reading Goal #3: #readmyowndamnbooks – 2016 was a huge year for book buying for me, and my physical TBR shelves have exploded. This year, I’d ideally like to focus on reading the books I own for the majority of my reading so that things don’t get too out of control.

Reading Goal #4: Read more big books – I’ve always been a huge fan of immersing myself in giant reads, but it’s something that I think being involved in bookish social media has somewhat dampened for me in the past few years. I think that I’ve been putting pressure on myself, intended or not, to read a certain number of books per month, and the fact that it takes me longer to read a 500+ page book has played into my decision on whether or not to pick up those longer reads. I’d like to try to ignore that “pressure” and instead just focus on what I really want to read, whether it’s 100 pages long or 1,000.

Potential reads: 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami, Arcadia by Iain Pears, The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell, The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee

Reading Goal #5: Read more lesser-known and/or independently published books – Again, this goal goes back to being more active on Bookstagram and Litsy, as well as the blogging community. There are some books that we tend to see more than others on bookish social media, and they do tend to be new releases and YA books. There’s nothing wrong with that, and I do like to read both new releases and YA some of the time, but I also think that I need to do a better job at picking up books that aren’t as well-known and to discover hidden gems that aren’t always hyped up online.

Reading Goal #6: Discover new favorite authors

Potential reads: Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente, White Teeth by Zadie Smith, All the Ugly and Wonderful Things by Bryn Greenwood

Reading Goal #7: Read more books from authors I love

Potential reads: Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson, Kindred by Octavia Butler, Hunger by Roxane Gay

Reading Goal #8: Relax, and enjoy what you read – Sometimes I can get too caught up in TBR lists and reading goals, and the resulting pressure can nudge me into a reading slump. So in 2017, I need to let myself realize that reading is fun and amazing no matter what I’m reading, and I don’t always need to overthink things. Reading is what I love, and it should be something that relieves stress, not adds to it!

 

What are your reading goals for 2017? Let me know!

 

 

2016 Reading Goals: How Did I Do?

I’m currently working on my reading goals for 2017 and debating with myself on how I want to focus my reading in the coming year. I’m almost overwhelmed by the sheer amount of books on my TBR and I feel like I want to read everything at once and dive into a million different directions. But before the 2017 reading extravaganza can begin, and before I post my full-on 2016 wrap-up post (because 2016 isn’t over yet!) I wanted to look back and see how I did on the reading goals I set for myself for 2016. So, here they are: my 2016 reading goals, and whether I succeeded or failed on these eight different challenges.

Reading Goal #1: Read more long books.

I definitely didn’t pick up every long book on my TBR shelf in 2016 (not even close, actually), but overall I didn’t do too badly on this goal. I did read a bunch of longer books, although those did tend to be fantasy and/or YA, which are faster reads for me, and I didn’t challenge myself by reading any long classics or anything like that. The longest books I read in 2016 included The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (1107 pages), A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas (624 pages), Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff (659 pages), and Mistborn: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson (647 pages).

Reading Goal #2: Read some older books, including at least 2 classics

Complete failure on this goal. I read zero classics in 2016 (I mean, I read Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s short story “The Yellow Wallpaper,” published in 1892, but I wouldn’t count that as a full book) and I’d say I read very few “older” books. The oldest books that I did read in 2016 were Love Poems by Pablo Neruda (pub 1952) and Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (pub 1966).

Reading Goal #3: Make a dent in my TBR shelf

Um. Well. I did read a pretty decent number of books on my physical TBR shelf, but I also bought a LOT of books this year, so a dent was definitely not made.

Reading Goal #4: Read more books I think I will love, and fewer books I think I will like

This goal was a tricky one; basically I wanted myself to not hold back from picking books that would be challenging yet rewarding, and not default to picking up silly books that I already sort of assumed in advance would turn into lackluster 2-star reads. I think overall I did better at this in 2016 than I did in 2015, but I think that in terms of those challenging-yet-rewarding books I hope to do even better in 2017.

Reading Goal #5: Discover new favorite authors

I’d say that this goal was a success! New favorite authors I discovered in 2016 include Amelia Gray, Jeanette Winterson, Becky Chambers, Jenny Lawson, Carmen Lau, Elena Ferrante, Samantha Hunt, and Cheryl Strayed.

Reading Goal #6: Read books I haven’t read by authors I know I love

I think I did pretty well at this goal; in 2016, I picked up books by previously-loved authors Kazuo Ishiguro, Octavia Butler, Leigh Bardugo, Sarah J. Maas, N.K. Jemisin, Jhumpa Lahiri, Seanan McGuire, Patrick Rothfuss, and Neil Gaiman.

Reading Goal #7: Participate in at least one Dewey’s Readathon

Success! I participated in both rounds of Dewey’s this year, and they were both wonderful.

Reading Goal #8: Continue with my favorite book series

Again, success! I read subsequent books in these series in 2016: the Kingkiller Chronicles, the Broken Earth trilogy, the Court of Thorns and Roses series, and the Six of Crows duology.

 

Do you set reading goals for yourself? How did you do on your 2016 goals? Let me know!

 

Dewey’s Readathon Game Plan and TBR

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I love October. It’s full of spooky, Halloween-related things and delicious pumpkin everything. October also means it’s time for another Dewey’s 24-hour Readathon, which tend to be the most awesome bookish events of the year. One of my favorite parts about the readathon is actually the anticipation and planning that come before the event; I love creating a TBR pile to sustain me through extended periods of reading, and figuring out how to maximize my reading time when I know I’ll still have to do things like work and sleep.

For me, the Readathon starts at 8 a.m. on Saturday morning. Like last time, unfortunately, I have to work the morning of the Readathon; I’m planning to get as much work as I can done ahead of time so that I can leave work in the early afternoon, hopefully by 1 or 2. I’ve found that listening to my audiobook on the way to and from work helps get me into the Readathon mindset early, even if I can’t fully participate until later.Β  I had to work the morning of the previous Readathon, too, and this really burnt me out (being on call for work all weekend didn’t help, either; once I started reading I kept getting interrupted). At least I’m not on call this time! And I’m planning on picking up Thai food from the delicious place near my office to bring home after work, as well, which is also a good motivator.

Once I finally get home, I’m hoping to hit the Readathon hard. I’ve found that it helps me to start with shorter books so that I can feel like I’m accomplishing something; that way, if I get stalled on my reading later, I’ll still know that I’ve hit a few reading goals.

Goals!

-Read 3 books – pretty doable if I stick to shorter ones

-Read for 12 hours – this will mean I’m basically reading the entire day when I’m not at work, so I’m being a bit ambitious here

-Post updates on Instagram, Litsy, and here

My TBRs for readathons tend to look a lot different from my monthly TBRs. I find that short books, YA, fast-paced reads, and graphic novels tend to work the best for me in a readathon; I need books that can either hold my attention for an extended period of time or that allow me to jump back and forth pretty quickly. I tend to look for “easier” reads and not try to tackle anything too ambitious, as reading an extremely complicated book for a few hours can make me start to look for a reading break rather than feel inspired to keep going all night long (which I never do, by the way. I’m a terrible sleeper to begin with and I can’t afford to give up a whole night’s sleep). I also need a good, absorbing audiobook that I can listen to while driving and doing random things around the house so that I don’t lose out on reading time if I need to get other things done.

So! Here is my TBR for Dewey’s, ranked in order of most to least likely to actually read. To clarify, there is no way that I would actually be able to read all of these books, but I think that these are a good selection for me to choose from:

Forest of MemoryForest of MemoryForest of MemoryForest of Memory

Forest of Memory by Mary Robinette Kowal – this is a science fiction novella by the author of Shades of Milk and Honey, which was sort of a Jane Austen retelling with magic that I read a few years ago and liked but didn’t love. This shorter novel is about a woman who loses contact with her A.I. and is unable to connect with the outside world, something that is constant and ubiquitous in the future, and has to deal with some sort of scary situation in the woods. I don’t really want to read too much about the plot since it’s a short work and I don’t want to spoil it, but it sounds sort of Octobery and I’ve been in a science fiction mood lately, so this is currently #1 on my list.

Fun Home: A Family TragicomicFun Home: A Family TragicomicFun Home: A Family TragicomicFun Home: A Family Tragicomic

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel – this is a graphic memoir about a daughter finding out that her father was gay after his death. I previously read Evie Wyld’s Everything is Teeth, another graphic memoir, and really enjoyed the format; I think this will be a good graphic novel to go with for the readathon.

Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff – I was sort of waffling about whether to read this for a really long time, until I sort of did a 180 and decided I needed to own this book immediately. It’s science fiction YA about two teenagers who break up and then get caught up in this huge adventure/conspiracy where their planet is at stake; the reason I think it’ll work well for the readathon is that it’s not written in a straightforward book way but made up of transcipts, emails, interviews, etc. I heard that it’s fast-paced and an easy read, so I think this might be the perfect thing for me.

Pretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The ShrikePretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The ShrikePretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The ShrikePretty Deadly, Vol. 1: The Shrike

Alex + Ada, Vol. 1Alex + Ada, Vol. 1Alex + Ada, Vol. 1Alex + Ada, Vol. 1

Pretty Deadly by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios and Alex + Ada by Jonathan Luna and Sarah Vaughn – I don’t know much about either of these graphic novels but I’ve seen them both recommended around BookTube. I tend to only pick up graphic novels during Readathons, so it’s always sort of fun to jump into a new one to mix up my reading.

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)

The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers – this is my current read, and it’s fantastic. I don’t usually tend to go for what I’m currently reading during Dewey’s, but I like having it as an option.

The Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist RevolutionThe Geek Feminist Revolution

The Geek Feminist Revolution by Kameron Hurley – this is my audiobook pick, and while I’m really interested in the content, I’m not loving the audio narrator so far. If it keeps going the way it is I might have to do a last-minute switch!

GutshotGutshotGutshotGutshot

Gutshot by Amelia Gray – this is a dark, supposedly super disturbing short story collection; I’ll pick this up if I’m in the mood for something October-y.

FurthermoreFurthermoreFurthermoreFurthermore

Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi – I started this middle-grade novel last month but wasn’t really getting into it; I think I need to give it another try because I’m a huge fan of Tahereh Mafi and the worldbuilding did seem very cool.

 

So that’s the plan for Saturday! Who else is participating? What are you planning on reading? Feel free to link me to your posts, I love to see what everyone else is doing for Dewey’s!

 

Dewey’s Readathon Goals and Game Plan

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So I already posted my TBR post for Dewey’s Readathon this Saturday (here: https://beachesandbooks.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/deweys-24-hour-readathon-tbr/), but I also wanted a space to lay out my Readathon game plan. Much like my TBR lists, my bookish game plans tend to fall apart, but it doesn’t mean it’s not fun to make them!

This is only my second Dewey’s Readathon, but I had so much fun with the first one I joined in October. It’s when I really got into the zone with Bookstagram and my book blog, and helped me dive into the bookish community and see what a friendly and wonderful place it is. It also made me immediately resolve to make the Readathon a bookish tradition for myself!

DEWEYs

Game Plan:

My Readathon start time is 8 a.m., which would normally work out quite well, but I actually have to work from about 8:30 until around 2 (I hope! There’s a chance I might need to stay later) so I have to postpone the start of my physical book-reading until the afternoon. I’m planning on audiobooking during my commute to and from work, which should give me around an hour of audiobook time before I can tackle the rest of my TBR. I’m bummed that I have to work–I did try to switch shifts, but unfortunately I got stuck. So I’m trying to make the most of it! It’s a good thing I’m super into my audiobook, because it’s been making my commute better all week. I’m about 1/3 of the way through Yes, Chef by Marcus Samuelsson, and I highly recommend it so far!

Yes, Chef

 

The second I get home, I’m planning on diving into full-on Readathon mode and not surrendering until I get into the Sunday a.m. hours. (Although I am also on call for work, so there is a chance I may have to go back for a bit, in which case more audiobook time!) I don’t plan on staying awake the entire 24 hours, because I am already an insomniac and can’t afford to have my sleep schedule thrown off anymore than it already is, but I think I’ll try to make it until 2 or 3 a.m. I know, it’s not hardcore, but it’s ambitious enough for me!

I feel like varying reading locations will be key to help prevent me from napping and missing reading time, so I’m going to be switching it up between my couch, my floor, and my roof–it’s supposed to be fairly nice out on Saturday, so some outside reading time might be nice!

Food-wise, I’m excited about the green tea chai latte mix I picked up at Trader Joe’s, because there’s nothing like reading with a delicious hot drink (even if it’s nice outside, it lets you pretend you’re snowed in with a book). I’m also thinking about ordering Thai food so I don’t have to cook anything, and also because I’m obsessed with Thai food.

Goals:

Finish 3 books. This is totally doable, considering the shortness of the books I picked out!

Don’t nap. I’m afraid I’m going to fall asleep accidentally, and that is not allowed to happen! I can sleep when I’m done Readathoning but not before.

And that’s pretty much it! I’m planning on Instagramming a lot (@beachesnbooks, if you’re on Instagram!), blogging a lot, reading a lot of other blog posts, and just enjoying the fact that some amazing people worked hard to create and promote such an awesome event.

Happy Readathon to everyone participating tomorrow!

 

 

Reading Goals for 2016

I may be a little early with this post, but as 2015 winds down and I begin to analyze my reading over the past year, I can’t help but look ahead to what I’d like to do differently once we hit January 1st. I’ve never been big on the idea of resolutions, because it seems too arbitrary, but I like the idea instead of setting goals. Resolutions are mandates, lines in the sand that make you a disappointment if you don’t stick to them (not that anyone ever does past the third week of January), but goals are inspirational and motivational. They’re encouraging rather than mocking. So, in the spirit of finding new areas of reading inspiration, here are my reading goals for 2016.

1.) Read more long books.

I love long books. I have the “I like big books and I cannot lie” mug to prove it. There is no better feeling than the arm strain associated with complete immersion in a giant book that you never want to end. But sometimes it’s hard to start a long book, because it means committing yourself to something for an extended period of time–there’s always the fear that it’ll be a lot of your precious reading time devoted to a book that wasn’t worth your while. This year, I’ll ditch the fear and dive into as many doorstopper books as I can. Particular book I have in mind: Little, Big by John Crowley.

2.) Read some older books, including at least two classics.

Goodreads has really helped how I analyze my reading. There’s a fun little tool that lets you analyze your reading year to year by number of books, number of pages…and the year books are published. When I took a look at mine, I was extremely embarassed–prior to reading Northanger Abbey last month for a reading challenge, the oldest book I’d read since 2009 was We Have Always Lived in the Castle, published in 1962. Even worse, the vast majority of my reading had been of books published during the 2000s. I like reading new books, and I’ve had some amazing reads, but I think in 2016 I need to think more about reading backwards in time as well. At least for a few of my picks. I also am a bit behind on my classics reading; I read a ton of classics in high school, but I haven’t returned much to the genre since then. Particular book I have in mind: Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak.

3.) Make a dent in my TBR shelf.

My TBR shelf is out of control. It’s been out of control for awhile, but now it has morphed from one single shelf to a jam-packed shelf plus a breakfast bar covered in books, plus several stacks of unread books in my closet. There are a lot of factors at work here: my love for library used book sales; my love of libraries in general that causes me to check out new books rather than reading what I already have; and my love of buying books that I either think I’ll love or that I’ve already read and are meaningful to me. But in 2016, I need to get down to business and read the books I have. I won’t ban myself from buying new books, because I physically cannot do that, but I’ll at least try to reduce the unread pile substantially.

4.) Read more books I think I will love, and fewer books I think I will like.

Sometimes I don’t pick up a book looking to find my next favorite. Sometimes I pick up a book because it seems like it will be a decent, fast read. And this is okay once in awhile, but I feel I did this a few times too many in 2015 and ended up with too high a percentage of two-star books that come out of me picking up a book and thinking, hey, this could be an okay guilty pleasure read. (examples? I’m a little embarrassed to admit that this year I read both I’m Not Here to Make Friends by Courtney Robertson, a memoir detailing her time on The Bachelor, and Down the Rabbit Hole by Holly Madison, about her life before, during, and after The Girls Next Door. Yeah. I’m not super proud about this.) In 2016, I want to avoid the lazy reading feeling that leads to two-star books, and focus more on books that I’ve been excited to read for a very long time because I have a strong feeling they could enter the favorites list. Particular book I have in mind: The Just City by Jo Walton.

5.) Discover new favorite authors.

I, like everyone, have several authors that I consider my favorites (Margaret Atwood, Neil Gaiman, Jose Saramago, Octavia Butler, N.K. Jemisin, Ilona Andrews, Lev Grossman, etc) and while I will happily devour new books by these authors as quickly as I can buy them, this year I’d like to add some new names to the list. This year I discovered Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie after reading and loving Americanah, and I plan to hit Half of a Yellow Sun hard in 2016, but I’d like to add at least one new name to the “favorites” list in 2016, or at least strive towards then. In addition, it seems criminal that I have never read a book by Zadie Smith, Salman Rushdie, Jo Walton, or Jonathan Franzen, and books by each of these authors are currently sitting on my TBR shelf, mocking me. Particular book I have in mind: White Teeth.

6.) Read books I haven’t read by authors I know I love.

There are a lot of authors whose books I’ve completely loved, but I haven’t yet gotten around to checking out any additional books by them yet. (See Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, above). 2016 is when I fix this! I’m thinking in particular about picking up The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro (I loved Never Let Me Go), 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami (I enjoyed the strangeness of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle), Fledgling by Octavia Butler (Dawn and Parable of the Sower are two of my absolute favorite books), and The Passion by A.S. Byatt (this year I read Ragnarok, one of the Canongate myths series, which was so beautiful and thought-provoking that I went crazy and bought two more books by Byatt).

7.) Participate in at least one Dewey’s Readathon.

This year was my first time doing a Readathon, and I absolutely loved it. It was a fantastic excuse to escape into books for the day and abandon outside stress. The thing is, I didn’t plan for it very far in advance–I read about it online about a week before the event and it was pure luck that I didn’t have to work that day. So in 2016, I want to schedule my Readathons early and block off those Saturdays so that I can be sure to participate in them again. And try to blog more during the Readathon next time, as well!

8.) Continue with my favorite book series.

Some people like to wait until an entire series is published before starting it. I am not one of these people. I am not nearly patient enough for that. I rely on new books to distract me in between series installments. That also means that every year there are plenty of great new releases to look forward to. In 2016 I’m beyond excited for Magic Binds by Ilona Andrews, the ninth Kate Daniels book; N.K. Jemisin’s The Obelisk Gate, the sequel to The Fifth Season and the second book in her Broken Earth series; Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo, the follow-up to the stellar Six of Crows; and A Court of Mist and Fury, Sarah J. Maas’s sequel to A Court of Thorns and Roses.